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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> susie: good evening everyone, tom hudson is on assignment. jeff yastine joins us. the federal reserve kept its key interest rate at zero, but said it's ready to take action to boost the economy when the time is right. that announcement came today as the fed wrapped up its policy meeting in washington. susie, one thing that stood out at this meeting is the fed is getting more worried about inflation. the problem is, inflation is too low, and below what the fed considers acceptable. >> susie: that could be the catalyst for the fed to pump more money into the economy. so what will the central bank do next? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: two more meetings. one two-day event in early november, the other in mid december. that's the window the fed has left this year to boost the economy. but, whether the central bank eases monetary policy in the next few months depends on what happens with the economy. and, fed watcher dana saporta says it's clear now that policymakers have linked their next move to inflation, or more specifically, the lack of it. >> i think the fed is loath to use the
double its u.s. workforce this holiday season, adding 45,000 temporary workers. the toy seller has already announced plans for 600 temporary toys 'r us express shops. the associated press is reporting the f.b.i. and the labor department are investigating the former head of the service employees international union for possible corruption. at issue: andy stern's approval of a california union leader's salary. stern resigned from the union abruptly in april. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street is "frontier." find out why that could be the place for global investors with an appetite for risk. >> susie: $1,300 and then some-- that's where gold prices closed today. gold rallied for the fifth straight day to a new high of $1,308. the precious metal is up 32% in the past year as investors seek safety. long-time metals traders like m.f. global's kevin grady think the buying binge will continue. >> well, i think we definitely hit $1,400 by christmas and possibly $1,500. i think, you know, what you need to look at is, who is going to step up and sell it? the bottom line is that
. and would indicate that it's going to take us quite a while before we get to full employment. >> susie: so if the economy grows 3.5% or more, as you're projecting, but the unemployment rate stays high, would you think that the fed has done its job? >> right now we're missing on both of our objectives. the inflation rate is too low and the unemployment rate is too high. so directionally i think it fairly clear which direction we should be moving. how much we should do and exact timing, that's a difficult question that requires a consensus, and that's why we have these meetings every six weeks. but it's clear right now that we're not where we want to be and we need to take some action to get there. >> susie: you can read the transcript of my entire interview with eric rosengren on our website. you'll find it on n.b.r. on pbs.org. >> tom: here are the stories in tonight's n.b.r. newswheel: stocks slipped. the dow fell 22 points, the nasdaq and the s&p 500 were both off about three points. trading volume was down a little on the big board from yesterday, but still over one billion shares. on t
our economy into a ditch, or do we keep moving forward with policies that are slowly pulling us out? >> reporter: too slowly, republicans fired back. on jobs, republican leader john boehner argued the president's policies are the problem, and a few new ideas won't change that. >> until this uncertainty and spending is under control... i don't think these are going to have much impact. >> reporter: what does all this politicking mean for your bottom line? first, on those new proposals from the president: $50 billion in infrastructure spending, an expansion and extension of the research and development tax credits, and 100% expensing of new equipment. the last is most likely to become law, and even that analysts consider a long shot. second, whatever the election outcome, there will be less help coming for the economy. goldman sachs washington analyst alec philips says that's one reason his firm is downgrading their economic forecast for 2011. >> there's really three things happening there. one is the fading effect of the 2009 fiscal stimulus bill. number two is our concern that congr
what high cholesterol is or how many visits and says, "use good medical management," well, that's an open-ended and very debatable question. >> reporter: also debatable? how disruptive the new law will be. already, insurers including aetna, cigna and humana say they will stop selling plans that cover only children. since they can't limit pre- existing conditions, insurers worry parents will wait until after kids are sick to buy coverage. and this is only the beginning. most of the big changes don't kick in until 2012, including new purchasing pools and the requirement for everyone to have insurance. florida insurance commissioner kevin mccarty expects lots of changes between now and then. >> some companies are going to be deciding whether to stay in the market. we obviously like to see a conservative approach to keep as many people in the marketplace as possible. >> reporter: while there is a lot of uncertainty in the implementation of the health care law, there's also uncertainty about the law itself. florida is one of 20 states suing to block the health care law, and many repu
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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